(photos courtesy of PiedeTerra)

The Venetian Fashion has always been something apart from Italian fashion in general. Once again Venice, decided to carve a slightly different path. Now, this is unsurprising when you consider that for so long, as with the rest of Italy, it was a completely separate country, with its own rules, culture and therefore also trends. It is also unsurprising because of the unique nature of Northern City, and the gentry that lived here.

It is said that the fashion is said to have been led by the Aristocracy and the Courtesans, an idea that speaks volumes in itself. However, there a few things that are worthy of considering as we enter into the discussion of the fashion that has remained. Firstly, the considerable distances covered on foot, which makes it an unfriendly city for high heels. Secondly, the Bora Winds, which are relentlessly cold, and each time take you by surprise. Finally, the undeniable necessity to occasionally be unrecognizable in Venice.

In this article we are not going to cover every item of clothing that the City is well known for, but just two of my personal favourites, but that are also arguably two of the most famous nowadays. Frulane, Venetian slippers, and the Tabarro/ Mantello, the Venetian cloak.

Furlane: The Venetian slippers, have more recently become increasingly popular worldwide but were originally found in the countryside. Made in velvet with a rubber bottom, from reused bicycle tiers, they quickly became adopted by

The Venetian slippers, have more recently become increasingly popular worldwide but were originally found in the countryside. Made in velvet with a rubber bottom, from reused bicycle tiers, they quickly became adopted by Gondoliers for two reasons. Firstly, comfort and secondly so as not to mark the boat.
Nowadays they can be found in so many different materials and different styles that it is almost essential to have more than one pair.

Il Tabarro/Mantello:

This was originally noted in the Medieval ages, as a slight descendent of the Roman Toga. It was then abandoned for a period until the Renaissance when it was the particular favourite of many Bourgose or Aristocracy. However, once again disappeared for the public eye until the ‘Dandy’s’ of the 18th Century re-doned it, and with this, also brought a certain disputable association, which is secretly enjoyed by those who wear them today.

It was and still is particularly popular for travelling, as it was very effective at keeping out the cold and can be draped over everything.
To me it has always had such a strong connection with Venice, as it is only really here that I can imagine the elegance of a cloak sweeping around the corner, not wanting to be followed, it is also interesting that there is something about Venice, that seems to just fit this style.

As we move into the winter months, with winds whipping around the corners, acqua alta rising, you may well ask how it can be possible to maintain a level of elegance?
Whilst Venice is not renowned for its shopping throughout all Italy, for good reason, there are a few shops that are well worth visiting, especially when searching for these particular garments. They have found the balance between traditional techniques and modern style.

For il Tabarro and hand crafted hats

Monica Daniele
SAN POLO 2235, CALLE SCALETER 30125 VENEZIA

ARRAS TESSUTI

DORSODURO 3235, CAMPIELLO SQUELINI 30123 VENEZIA

Tabarro (online)

For Furlane:

Piede Terra

Vibi Venezia (online)

Dittura Massimo and his father Gianni.